Halloween Recipe: How to Make a Spooky Mashed Potato Spider Web

Halloween Potato Spider Web

Need a Halloween recipe that will encourage your kids to eat their veggies? This spooky bowl of mashed potatoes is just the thing.

Halloween recipes are usually all about the candy, but you can also make delicious healthy treats to celebrate this year. For this spooky spiderweb, a bowl of creamy mashed potatoes are your canvas, and you use shredded carrots, black olives, and dried rosemary to create the web and the spider.

You don’t have to make those delicate shredded carrots yourself. Check your grocery store’s produce section for a bag of already-shredded carrots. If you can’t find them, use a knife to julienne the carrots into the thinnest sticks that you can.

Halloween Recipe: Spooky Mashed Potato Spiderweb

Ingredients

  • 1 batch of buttermilk mashed potatoes
  • 1 bag shredded carrots, or at least 1/2 cup carrots very thinly sliced
  • 2 jumbo black olives
  • 8 pieces of dried rosemary

Directions

1. Heap your mashed potatoes into a large bowl, then use a spoon to smooth them down. With a clean dish towel, wipe any potato from the sides of the bowl, so you have a clean canvas to start:

Bowl of Mashed Potatoes

2. Use your carrots to build your web, like in the images below. Start by creating an X with your carrots, then add two more rows to create an asterisk. Finally, use the carrots to create a few circles connecting the lines of your web:

Carrot Spider Web

3. Make your spider. Slice about a 1/4″ piece off of the top of one of your olives, and slice the other olive in half lengthwise. One of the olive halves is going to be your spider body, and the small piece is its head. You can eat the other two pieces of olive. You deserve a snack after making that detailed web!

Sliced Olives

4. To give your spider its legs, very carefully press each piece of rosemary into the sides of the large half olive. Place the spider body and head on your web, and you’re all done!

Cooking With Fall Flavors: Seasoned Potato Recipes for Autumn

Spice Tins

Don’t you love fall flavors? Spicy ginger, rich sage, and other strong spices make fall food that much more comforting.

What’s great about adding bold seasonings to your cooking is that the more you season the less you need to rely on salt to make your food taste good. In fact, many of those pre-made salt substitutes are simply herb blends that flavor your food with herbs and spices instead of sodium.

Pairing those strong flavors with potatoes is a natural fit, since potatoes are also naturally salt free. Some fall flavors go best with white potatoes, and others taste best with sweet potatoes. We’ve pulled together some side dishes and entree ideas for you that use autumn herbs and spices.

Ginger

Fall Flavors: Ginger

Spicy ginger pairs beautifully with sweet potatoes. The sweetness from the potatoes helps take the edge off of the ginger’s spiciness, so don’t fear the ginger if you’re not a spicy food fan. Here are a couple of recipe ideas centered around ginger.

Side dish: Marmalade and Ginger-Glazed Sweet Potatoes

Entree: Pork, Sweet Potato and Apple Saute

Cardamom

Fall Flavors: Cardamom

Cardamom is one of the herbs that makes chai tea so comforting, and it is a staple in Indian cooking. If you’re intimidated by cooking your own Indian food, check out these easy Indian recipes!

Side dish or entree: Indian Chickpea and Potato Stew

Entree: Cardamom-Honey Chicken Thighs with New Potatoes

Garlic

Fall Flavors: Garlic

Fall is garlic season. Almost any savory dish is tastier with a little bit of garlic, but here are a couple of recipes that feature this universal spice.

Side dish: Roasted Garlic and Potato Soup

Entree: Garlic Steak with Mushrooms and Onion-Roasted Potatoes

Sage

Fall Flavors: Sage

Sage has a rich, earthy flavor that’s delicious with beans, meat, or veggies. Try these recipes to add a little sage to your supper.

Side dish or entree: Sweet Potato and White Bean Soup with Sage-Walnut Pesto

Entree: Cider-Braised Chicken Thighs with Sweet Potatoes and Sage

Banana Peppers

Fall Flavors: Hot Peppers

If you like a little heat, hot peppers are the perfect addition to your fall menu. You can use a pinch or add generous amounts for some atomic-level heat!

Side Dish: Southwestern-Style Potatoes Roasted with Peppers and Herbs

Entree: Potato Black Bean Chili

Turmeric

Fall Flavors: Turmeric

Turmeric is another Indian spice, and it’s loaded with health benefits. It’s a close relative to saffron but much less expensive. It can be a little bit more bitter, so start with a little turmeric and add more as you get used to cooking with this vibrant yellow spice.

Side Dish: Roast Potatoes with Chili and Turmeric

Entree: Salmon and Autumn Vegetables Soup with Turmeric

What are your favorite fall flavors to cook with?

 
Creative Commons Image Credits:

Spice Tins by Curtis Perry
Cardamom by Steven Jackson
Garlic Clove by Liz West
Growing Ginger at Home by Susy Morris
Drying Sage by Mike Chaput
Banana Peppers by Steven Jackson
Turmeric II by Steven Jackson

Harvesting Potatoes: Our Favorite Time of Year

Tractors in the field

What do you love about fall? Is it the cool weather? The leaves changing color? For us, harvesting potatoes is the best part about fall.

Right now, our farmers have fields of farm fresh potatoes, and they’re ready to pluck, clean, and send to your kitchen. We love the fall potato harvest because we love providing those healthy spuds for you and your family to enjoy. But how does growing and harvesting potatoes work? Let’s look and see…

Harvesting potatoes starts in the spring.

Have you ever left a potato on the counter for too long, and it started sprouting eyes or even little shoots? Potatoes are actually the seeds of the potato plants, and when they sprout that way, they’re actually trying to grow more potatoes.

In early spring, we plant what are called “seed potatoes.” They’re not much different from the potatoes that you eat for supper. The big difference is that they’re guaranteed to sprout and grow. We want to make sure that every seed we plant grows up to make plenty of healthy spuds for your family to eat.

Our seed potatoes go into the ground after the last frost of the spring, and we get to harvesting those potatoes just before the first freeze of the fall. It’s not easy to predict, but our farmers are old pros.

Potato Fields

Come fall, we get to harvesting potatoes for you.

This year we planted a brand new variety of potatoes – Golden Russets – at Ernie Ford’s Sunny Valley Farms in Colorado. You can see his field in the picture above.

Our farmers use a special tractor called a potato harvester to dig up all of those taters that are almost ready to eat. Here’s one of our special trucks harvesting and shaking some of the extra soil off of the organically grown Golden Russets that Ernie Ford grew for us:

Harvest Truck

From the harvester, we clean ’em off even more, then move ’em to a truck. After we fill up a truck with Ernie’s potatoes they make their way to our storage facilities, where they get another round of cleaning then rest in the cool, dark storage space so they can cure and be ready to ship to stores. Here are Ernie’s potatoes on their way to the cool storage:

Potato Storage

Those spuds rest for a while, and then we pack ’em up and ship ’em off to stores for you.

We love potato harvest time so much that we even made a special video to show off how our farm fresh potatoes go from our farmers’ fields to your plate. Take a look!

Of course, the best part about the fall potato harvest is eating those farm fresh spuds. Check out our recipes section for healthy potato recipes that your family will love!